2 days in Arches National Park

 

Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Today was the day I was going to visit Arches National Park.  The previous day I had visited Bryce Canyon National Park and this morning I got up to drive the 4 hours from Panguitch where I had stayed, to spend the afternoon in Arches.

Arches National Park was established on 12 April 1929 as a National Monument and became a National Park on 12 November 1971.  It was the 36th National Park to be established.

I was visiting in mid September so luckily the park was not too busy.  I managed to get straight in with my $80 annual pass, at busy times you can be queuing for a long time to get in.  If you don’t have an annual pass then it will cost you $25 per vehicle.

My first stop was the visitors centre so that I could find out exactly what there was to do in the park and what I had time to fit in, in my 36 hours there.  After I then stopped at Park Avenue Viewpoint and Trailhead, from here you can do a 1 mile walk down to The Organ.  I did not do this though, as you need to walk the same way back to get your car and I had quite a bit I wanted to fit in before the park closed.

The view of the court house towers on the right of the picture below is amazing.

Courthouse Towers, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

I then drove down to La Sal Mountains Viewpoint.  On the picture below, on the right you can see The Organ.  You can also see Three Gossips on the left.

The Organ, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Next I decided to drive to Balanced Rock.  Here is a very easy 0.3 mile walk around the rock which is 39 metres tall!!  It does look like the rock on top is balancing but it is actually connected to the rock below which is eroding faster that the 3,600 tonne Sandstone rock above it.  Eventually this rock will no longer be able to “balance” and will fall to the ground like it’s smaller sibling, chip off the old block!!

Balanced Rock, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Next I drove to Double Arch and parked up, there is a huge car park here as from here you can also do the North & South Window.  It is an easy 0.5 mile round trip to Double Arch and probably the best views are from a little further away.  It is the tallest arch in the park at 34 metres and is created by the sand being blown by the wind and cutting the rock.

Double Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

I then walked over the The Windows section, where you can see the North and South Window. It is only a 1 mile round trip and this includes the hike around the back of them.  Luckily for me there was a well located rock that I could perch my camera on, to get the shot below, with me and both windows!!

North & South Windows, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Found a man for the next one!!

North & South Windows, Arches National Park, Utah, USA North & South Windows, Arches National Park, Utah, USA North & South Windows, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

As it was getting late, I called it a day and headed into Moab to check into my hostel and get some dinner.  It’s a nice little town with lots of restaurants and supermarkets and a great location for exploring both Arches NP and Canyonlands NP.

The next day I was up early and into the park to do some hikes.  I decided first to see the Delicate Arch, it is the largest freestanding arch in the park.  As the road to the lower viewpoint was closed the only option to see it was to do the 3 mile roundtrip hike.  I was planning on doing this hike so for me it was fine, though it did mean that it was really busy as people who wanted to see Delicate Arch had no option but to do the hike.  It’s quite a difficult hike as you have to hike up a rock (you can just make out the people hiking up on the picture below) but well worth it to see probably the most famous place and for me the most spectacular place in Arches National Park.

Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Next I drove to Devil’s Garden Trailhead.  Here it is probably the busiest for parking and I stopped off and had a picnic after abandoning the car as near to the car park as I could get.

I first decided to go to Sand Dune Arch, you had to squeeze between some rocks to get there, it’s only 0.3 mile round trip so a nice easy walk to do and a great arch to see.

Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

I then walked to Broken Arch through the meadow and as you can see the Arch is not actually broken.

Broken Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Broken Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Broken Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Landscape Arch is the longest arch in the world at 88 metre.  You used to be able to hike underneath it but in 1995 a huge section on the right hand side broke away narrowly missing some visitors to the park and now there is a fence keeping you away.  It’s not known whether this means that the arch will soon fall away and no longer be there or whether now there is less weight it will be around for a few more hundred years.  I guess time will tell.  To hike here it is about 0.8 mile walk from the trailhead, there is a gravel path so it is quite an easy walk and I saw lots of people that hiked to this point.

Landscape Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USALandscape Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USAFrom Landscape Arch you have a view of Partition Arch but the hike to get up to it, is slightly more difficult as you have to climb up these rocks.  It’s quite high up and in certain places you need to use your hands and feet.  It is well worth it as the view from up there is amazing and you can also sit just through the arch and read your book or admire the views.

Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Partition Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

On the hike up to Partition Arch you can also see Navajo Arch.  After a little rest and reading my book it was back down the path and on to the final set of Arches.  It is 2.1 miles from the trailhead but it takes quite a while to walk as at times you have to climb up rocks and walk along some narrow ledges.  The views you see are amazing though and if you are used to hiking then not too difficult a hike.

Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Finally I reached Double O Arch which is spectacular, it is huge.  It is 21 metres long and gets its name from the huge arch at the top and smaller arch below, both in the shape of an O.

Double O Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Double O Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA Double O Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

There are signs advising you to keep away from the arches and not to climb through, but it is possible with a little bit of help to climb through the first “o” to get to the other side and hike up the rock behind it and get this amazing view.

After this I hiked up to Dark Angel and back around the primitive trail to see Private Arch and then back to the trailhead.

Arches is a beautiful park and if you want to see everything then you need between one and a half and two days there.  There are some great hikes and it is well worth spending some time there.

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Arches National Park

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Visiting the Tremp Valley in the Spanish Pyrenees

Tremp, Lleida, Spain

While I was in Spain I decided to visit my friends sister who lives in the Tremp Valley in the Spanish Pyrenees, as I had heard that they lived in a stunning area and it just happened to be on the route I was taking to Andorra. 3 years previously they moved from the UK and set up a business in Spain. Continue reading

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A day trip to Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

After I had visited Arches National Park, the next day I decided to visit Canyonlands National Park.  It was the 31st National Park when it was established in September 1964.

I had been staying in Moab and so it was only a 35 minute drive to the park.  The entrance fee for this park is $25 but I had my annual pass bought for $80, worth the fee if you are visiting a few parks.

There are two parts of the park which are not joined and I decided to see the area near Moab which is the Island in the Sky (this is also covers the largest area).  I firstly stopped at the visitors centre to get my map and find out what there is to see in the area. I only had till mid afternoon to explore, as after this I was driving down to Williams where I would be based to see the Grand Canyon.  This was a 400 mile drive which would take around 6 and a half hours!! Luckily Arizona is an hour behind Utah so I had an extra hour to see the park!!

My first stop was Shafer Canyon Overlook, here you can park up and walk out onto the rock and see the view of the Canyon, it is an amazing view from here and one that made my instantly fall in love with this park.

Shafer Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

Shafer Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

I could have stayed here forever looking at this view, it’s stunning.  From near here you can also see the Shafer Trail road, this is a road where you will need a 4×4 and can actually drive into the canyon.  Once down there, there are lots of trails that you can do from 1 day to over a week.  There are also various campgrounds along the trail, though you will need to take your own water in with you.

Next I drove to Upheaval Dome, here it is a 1 mile hike to the first viewpoint, with the option of another mile hike to the second viewpoint.  It’s quite uneven ground but there is a path to follow and not too tough of a hike.

Upheaval Dome, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

They believe that Upheaval dome is an eroded impact crater caused by the impact of a meteorite somewhere around 60 million years ago.  The white rock in the centre that has been pushed up into a dome certainly stands out against the redness of the rock everywhere else in the surrounding area.

There are quite a few hikes in this area, you can go around the crater, into the crater and down into the canyon to the river.

Upheaval Dome, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

From here I got back in the car and drove the short distance to Whale Rock.  It gets its name from the huge white sandstone it is made from and looking at it from a distance it looks like a whale.  You can climb to the top, from the car park it is about 1 mile, though for some people it might be quite tough and some bits you need to use your hands and bum.  The views from the top though are amazing, you can see the surrounding valley and as I was here alone, I decided to take a break and read my kindle and have a snack for a short time.

Whale Rock, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA Whale Rock, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

I then continued driving back towards Green River but on the way saw the view of Holeman Spring Canyon and decided to stop at the overlook.  From the car park you can walk right up to the edge and see right into the canyon.  I decided to stop here and sit down and have lunch and just stare at the views.  Just breath taking and I was lucky that there was a rock at the right height to get a pic!!  Near here there is also a trail that leads down into the canyon.

Buck Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

After having my lunch and admiring the view I got in the car to continue on to Green River Overlook.  The view from here down into the canyon is amazing.  It is different to the Grand Canyon but still as amazing.  You could also see cars driving the White Rim Road and they looked like little dots

Green River Overlook, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA Green River Overlook, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA Green River Overlook, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

Next i drove the 6 miles down to the Grand View Point Overlook, here you can do up to a 2 mile hike along the canyon rim.  The views are amazing and I decided to do this, it’s an easy walk but be careful as in a lot of places there is nothing to stop you falling over the edge and down into the valley.  It is certainly worth taking the time to do though.

Grand View Point Overlook, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

Finally I visited what probably makes the park most famous, Mesa Arch.  This is actually only 6 miles from the visitors centre, but I was told that the lighting would be better later in the day so I decided to visit on my way out.  Many people visit at sunrise to get the shot of the sun coming through the arch, when I visited in the afternoon luckily there were only a few people there.  The view looking down into Buck Canyon is amazing.

Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah, USA

It’s a short half mile round trip from the car park, though the ground is quite uneven.  It is stunning though and worth the visit and one of the highlights of the park.

After this it was back in the car for the 400 mile drive to Williams, where I would stay for the evening before heading to the Grand Canyon the next day.

To see everything I saw you need around 5 or 6 hours at the park, but you could easily spend a full day there or shorter if you decided against doing some of the hikes.  For more information on the park or the different hikes, click here.

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Read about to do on a day trip to Canyonlands National Park

 

 

 

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Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada

Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA

While I was visiting Death Valley, I was told at the Amargosa Opera House & Hotel where I was staying that I had to go and visit Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge.

It is a 15 minute drive from Death Valley Junction where I was staying and 20 minutes from the I95. If you are heading to Death Valley by the entrance at Furnace Creek then you will pass Ash Meadows, so it’s worth having a stop for an hour or longer. What else is great is that it does not cost to enter.

There is a visitor centre there with exhibits and a video you can watch on Ash Meadows and from the visitors centre you can also access the Crystal Springs Boardwalk which is what I did.

Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA

I was there at the end of September and temperatures were still in the high 30’s so despite the walk only being a mile you still need to carry water with you and put sun cream on too.

The crystal springs are beautiful and where I saw the most wildlife, it also produces 2,800 gallons of water a minute. The wetlands when I was there were pretty dry as it was the end of summer but in the winter the area can become very flooded.

Crystal Springs, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USAAsh Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA

Ash Meadows was established in June 1984 and is managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. It is 23,000 acres of spring fed wetlands and has 26 endemic species.  With only 3 inches of rain a year it is reliant on the water from the springs.

There are also 2 other boardwalks that you are able to visit, Kings Spring & Point of Rocks Boardwalk and Longstreet Spring & Cabin Boardwalk, they are 0.5 miles and 0.2 miles, so nice easy walks.  I also visited Horseshoe Marsh as I drove around the Crystal Loop road.  There are a few roads to drive along to see various parts of the park.  Despite the distances not being large it can take a while as the roads are all gravel tracks.

Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, USA

It is a great little park to visit, probably the best time to visit is in spring and autumn rather than summer as especially in spring there will be more plants to see.  During summer the animals tend to keep away or hidden during the day due to the heat.  The best time to visit in summer is in the morning as the hottest part of the day here is actually late afternoon!!

Have you ever visited Ash Meadows or visited the area? Let me know.

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If you are heading to Death Valley then it's worth a stop at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada, USA

 

 

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Top Things to do in South Dakota

Mount Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota, USA

I visited South Dakota to see a friend but ended up seeing some amazing places.  A few I had heard of previously but had no idea they were in South Dakota.  It’s a great state with lots to see.

Watertown

Lake Kampeska, Watertown, South Dakota

On my 2 month trip around the US, I decided to visit South Dakota to visit a friend I had met in Patagonia to see him and his wife.  He lived in Watertown, a small city in the East of South Dakota.  Luckily the greyhound bus made a stop here at a gas station out of town and so I got dropped off there before Bipin picked me up.

The first night Bipin and his wife Surekha took me to see Lake Kampeska which is quite near there house.  It’s a great lake for taking a walk or cycling around.  Though it is 13.5 miles around it.

Lake Kampeska, Watertown, South Dakota

The next day Surekha took me to Yoga, the first time I had ever tried.  I didn’t understand the whole breathing part but it felt good to have a good stretch.  After we had lunch before going to the Redlin Art Centre.  Terry Redlin was born in Watertown and is one of America’s most popular wildlife artists.  The centre contains most of his artwork.  It is free to visit and I really enjoyed seeing his paintings.

Redlin Art Center Watertown, South Dakota

Thanks Bipin for the pic and for letting me stay with you and Surekha, I had a great few days.  That evening we went to their friend’s for a meal and the next morning, I left to carry on my trip to Sioux Falls.

Sioux Falls

Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA

Sioux Falls is the biggest city in the state of South Dakota and the city was originally settled around the falls which is in the centre of the town.  The falls are beautiful and are lit up at night too.  There is also a 16 mile bike trail along the river.

Rapid City

After my visit to Sioux Falls I got the bus to my next stop in Rapid City. I arrived about 6pm and found that the local bus service finishes at 5.30pm and so I had to walk the 2 miles to my hotel.  Unfortunately there were no hostels in Rapid City but I did manage to get a cheap hotel/motel that had a pool!!

The next morning I then had a short walk to go pick up my car from the rental company before I headed off for the day.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Mount Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota, USA

I had previously seen Mount Rushmore in films and once I found out that it was in South Dakota, I knew I had to visit.  As I had just picked up a rental car in Rapid City it only took me 35 mins to drive out.  The entrance is free but it costs $10 to park.

Custer State Park

Custer State Park, South Dakota, USA

Custer State Park was one of my favourite parks in the US, but maybe that’s because it was the first time I had seen Bison, it is a great park, with a lot of wildlife.  It’s about a 40 minute drive from Rapid City or as I did it, a 45 minute drive from Mount Rushmore.  It costs $20 per vehicle into the park and this is valid for 7 days.

Crazy Horse Memorial

Crazy Horse Memorial South Dakota USA

Crazy Horse Memorial is still a work in progress.  They began work on it in 1948 and there is no finish date as all work is funded by donations or the fees from visitors.  It costs $11 per person and an extra $4 to take the shuttle for a closer look.  Though being able to get right up to the face of Crazy Horse will set you back about $125.  On a evening there is a laser show, which is well worth staying to watch if you visit late afternoon.

Badlands National Park

Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA

Badlands National Park is located about an hours drive east of Rapid City.  It’s a great park to visit and see the way the landscape has been shaped over the years.  The mountains have been eroded by water over time and further on in the park is a prairie.  It costs $20 per vehicle or if you are visiting a few national parks then worth investing in the $80 annual pass as I did.

Is there any other places you have visited in South Dakota, you think should be on the list? If so, let me know.

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A day trip to Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA

Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USAWhile I was in South Dakota, I decided that I had to visit Badlands National Park.  I ended up falling in love with the US National Parks on this trip and ended up seeing 10 and changing my plans.  They are well set up, with such helpful staff to advise you the best things to see and do in the time you have there.

I had just visited Sioux Falls and got the greyhound bus across to Rapid City.  I had wanted to rent a car and drive but it was going to cost an extra $900 to pick the car up in Sioux Falls and drop it off in Rapid City!!  To rent it in Rapid City for 2 days was less than $100.

My first day in Rapid City, I visited Mount Rushmore, Custer State Park and Crazy Horse Memorial and the second day I decided to visit Badlands National Park.

Badlands National Park is around 60 miles from Rapid City back towards Sioux Fall, so it takes about an hour to drive and I entered at the Pinnacles entrance as it was the nearest to Rapid City.  It costs $20 per vehicle to enter the park, though if you are planning to visit a few of the parks it might be worth buying the annual pass for $80 which is what I did.  Visiting 10 parks on this trip I certainly saved a lot of money!!

It was originally declared a National Monument on 4 March 1929, before becoming the 39th National Park in November 1978.  It covers an area of 242,756 acres with a large grass prairie and rocks eroded over time to create pinnacles and spires.

For 11,000 years this area was used by the native americans to hunt.  The prairie’s were home to many animals with the views from the higher rocks making it an ideal hunting ground.

The area is also popular with fossil hunters, with fossils from 77 species being found in the White River which flows through the park.

I decided first to drive part of the Sage Creek Rim Road to see the views, it is a gravel track so you are unable to drive fast along it, but it’s worth doing part of it to see your first views of the park.  The road is 25.5 miles but I only did the first 4 miles to see these views.

Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA

I then decided to drive along the Badlands Loop Road, it is 22 miles long and winds through the park and takes you to the Northeast entrance where the visitors centre is located.

The views along this road are amazing and there are quite a few overlooks and viewpoints to stop at to admire the views through the valley.

Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA

The colouring of the different layers of rock is stunning to see as you drive through the valley.

Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA

Once you get near the visitors centre there are also a few trails that you can walk, with the castle trail being the longest.  Unfortunately as I had to be back in Rapid City to catch a bus to Bozeman for the next part of my trip, I never had time to do any of the walks.

There are quite a few nice boardwalk walks that are short, the Window Trail, Door Trail, Notch Trail and you also walk down into the prairie.

You could easily spend a full day exploring Badlands National Park but if you are short of time then it would take you half a day to do the trip I did.

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Read about my trip to Badlands National Park, South Dakota, USA and what there is to see and do there

 

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A visit to Custer State Park, South Dakota, USA









Custer State Park, South Dakota, USA

As I was in Rapid City I decided to see Custer State Park, that morning I had visited Mount Rushmore and after I decided to head straight for Custer State Park.

It was South Dakota’s first state park and is the largest it has.  It was named after Lt Colonel George Armstrong Custer, who I had learned about at school, who had fought and died in the Battle of Little Bighorn and one of a few places in the US named after him, though it is a few hundred miles away from where he died in the battle. Continue reading

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Castles to visit in Luxembourg

There are over 50 castles to visit in Luxembourg, so if castles are your thing then you have a lot of choice.  Some of them have been restored and others are just ruins.  Here are the 9 castles I visited when I was in Luxembourg.

Vianden Castle

Vianden Castle Luxembourg

Vianden Castle is probably the most popular castle in Luxembourg and visited by thousands of people every year.  Continue reading

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Luxembourg City in 1 day

When I booked Luxembourg I thought I would need 2 days to see the city, but I was wrong, to see everything within the city you only need 1 day unless you intend to visit a few of the museums.  There are also trips which can be done outside the city to Echternach for hiking and Vianden to see the castle, which can be done by bus or car.  I spent a total of 5 days in Luxembourg but you could see most things in 2 or 3 days.

I flew in from England to Luxembourg city, a small airport and stayed at the Hostelling International Youth Hostel in the city, its a great location and only about a 10 minute walk to the centre of town.  From the airport you get the number 16 bus to Hamilius stop which is 5 minutes walk from the Place d’Armes and 15 minutes walk from the hostel. Continue reading

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Luxembourg in 1, 2 or 3 days

Luxembourg City

Luxembourg is a very small country, only 51 miles long by 35 miles wide and you can see a lot in 1, 2 or 3 days.

I spent a total of 5 days in Luxembourg and one of those days I did a day trip to Germany as I had allocated 2 days to see Luxembourg City but unless you are planning on visiting a few museums then only 1 day is needed.

Here is my intinerary and what I would recommend if you only have a few days in the country.

Day 1

Luxembourg City Luxembourg City

I would recommend if you have only 1 day in the country, then to spend that day exploring Luxembourg City, it is a beautiful city and one I fell in love with in minutes.

You can visit the Bock Casemates, walk the Chemin de la Corniche, see the old town, visit a fort, there are also lots of museums to visit too.

Day 2

Trier Germany Trier Germany

As I had seen everything I wanted to see in Luxembourg city within a day, I asked the hostel what I could do for the day and they suggested exploring Trier.  It is just across the border in Germany and is the oldest city in Germany.  It is very beautiful and if you have an extra day then well worth a visit.  It is only 50 minutes by train from Luxembourg City and the town is easily seen in a day.  The most famous things to see are Porta Nigra and the Market Square.

Day 3

Bourscheid Castle

I picked up a car from the airport and decided to have a day visiting castles.  My first castle was Bourscheid Castle, built in 1095 and partly restored but mainly ruins.  It costs 5 Euros and includes an audio guide.

Clervaux Castle

I then drove up to Clervaux in the north of the country and walked around the bottom of the castle before hiking to the top of hill to see the Abbey.  The castle holds 3 museums which you can visit or you can just walk up to the castle and into the courtyard as I did.  There is a church near the castle but the Abbey is at the top of the hill behind the church and is about a 15 minute walk.  It is well worth the walk up to see.

Wiltz Castle

I then made my way south to Wiltz and to see the castle. The castle is now the National Museum of Brewing, but you are able to walk into the courtyard and around the grounds.

Esch-Sur-Sure Castle

My favourite of the day was Esch-Sur-Sure, because of the view from the opposite hill.  I parked the car and then walked up to the ruins on top of the hill in the middle of the town.  The castle was built in the 13th century and there are only ruins left.  If you climb the hill on the opposite side and follow the path, you get a great view of the town and of the ruins.

Day 4

Mullerthal Trail Luxembourg Mullerthal Trail Luxembourg

I decided that I wanted to see a bit of the country and do some hiking, so I decided to do part of the Mullerthal trail.  It is split into 3 routes, all around 37/38km long, but you are able to do part of them too and get the bus back to Echternach.  I hiked about 22km from Echternach to Hersberg and caught the bus back.  It was a beautiful walk, though tough in places and after 22km I was ready to call it a day.  As I had finished around 5.30pm, I decided to have dinner in Echternach, see the cathedral and have an ice cream before heading back to my hostel.  As I arrived back in Bourglinster while it was still light I decided to go and explore Bourglinster Castle.  This is now a restaurant, but you are still able to walk around the grounds and into the courtyard.

Day 5

Vianden Castle, Luxembourg

This was my final day with the car and so I decided to see the rest of the castles I had missed.  I had deliberately left the castle everyone had said I must see if there was only 1 castle I would see in Luxembourg and that is Vianden Castle.  The castle is beautiful and has been well restored and costs 7 Euros to visit, I also decided to get the audio guide at 2 Euros and it was worth it, to find out more history of the castle.  The town too is so beautiful and lovely to walk through.  There is a ski lift up the mountain, though you can easily walk from the castle in about 20 minutes to the café at the top.

Beaufort Castle Luxembourg

I then drove to Beaufort Castle, here you can walk around the ruins of the castle built in the 11th century.  The renaissance castle next to it can be visited but only on a private tour at certain times of the week and must be booked in advance.

Larochette Castle Luxembourg

My final castle of the day was Larochette, another ruin built originally in the 11th century.  It is only a ten minute walk from the town and worth a visit.  It was then back to the airport to drop off the car before heading back to Luxembourg City for my final night.

If you only have 1 day in Luxembourg

If you only have 1 day in Luxembourg then, Luxembourg City is a must see.  There is enough to keep you busy for the day.

2 days in Luxembourg

If you have 2 days then on your second day I would say you must visit Vianden. It is possible to get the bus to Vianden from Luxembourg City.  If you have a car then you could also visit some of the other castles I have mentioned in the same day.

3 days in Luxembourg

If you have 3 days then for the extra day I would do a hike. There are so many to choose from in different areas of the country but the most popular are around Echternach.  It is possible to get the bus from Luxembourg City to Echternach and do either part of the Mullernthal trail or do the E1 trail which is 12km long and starts and finishes in Echternach.

If you are not into hiking then I would you could either go see some more castles or go to Trier in Germany for the day, it is a beautiful city.

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